JIRA Installation on Synology NAS – Part 4 – Auto-start

Introduction

Up until now, we’ve been starting JIRA by executing start-jira.sh from the command line. Of course, since we’re logged into an SSH session to get this command line interface, if we were to disconnect, the processes we start will all get killed. Having to keep an SSH session open to use JIRA is not exactly the way we want to have it set up. So, what do we need? A startup script linked into Synology’s boot! Read More

JIRA Installation on Synology NAS – Part 3 – Installation

Introduction

Now that we’ve got the system prepped for the installation, it’s time to start it!

First, we have to download JIRA. The only way to get the older versions is to look at Atlassian’s JIRA Downloads Archive. Remember, 5.2.11 is the latest version that is able to be installed on the Synology products with DSM 4.3 or lower. DSM is only a 32-bit operating system, so make sure to download the 32-bit version of JIRA. Also, to make everything easy, we’re going to use Atlassian’s linux installer – after all, that’s why we did all this prep! To save some time, here’s the link for the download that I used: http://www.atlassian.com/software/jira/downloads/binary/atlassian-jira-5.2.11-x32.bin

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JIRA Installation on Synology NAS – Part 2 – Preparation

After figuring out the Java limitations involved in running things on Synology’s DSM, I finally figured out a way that got JIRA installed on the NAS. I do not warranty this tutorial whatsoever, and there are some dangerous choices that were made. Any good linux user will spot them and hopefully be able to clean them up. If someone tries it with modifications, please post a comment and let me know what you changed.

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JIRA Installation on Synolgy NAS – Part 1 – Introduction

logoJIRAPNG[1]I am planning on starting up some software development work with a small team. One of the main things that small teams seem to forget is that they still need to stay organized. One of the ways we stay organized in the team we have at work is with Atlassian’s set of software development tools. All of them integrate nicely together and include a wiki (Confluence), git repository server (Stash / Bitbucket) and an excellent issue tracker (JIRA).

We are planning on using Bitbucket for our development because it will be closed-source and perfectly designed for small teams to be free (up to 5 users) with unlimited private repositories and completely fully-featured. JIRA just made sense for keeping track of issues alongside Bitbucket as they integrate together very well. The versatility of JIRA when compared to the other open-source offerings on the market is just unmatched. The closest I found was BugGenie – it included a wiki, which JIRA doesn’t by default as Confluence is a separate product that integrates. It was close, but just not quite what I was looking for, even though it was really easy to install by comparison as we will soon find out.

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